115D rip speed

vbimport

#1

Hi, just have a question about the ripping speed of the 115D with DL pressed dvds. I don’t have the need often, but currently the read speed will start at around 1.5-2.0 KB/s and very slowly rise up to around 4.0 and max out there.
I have had the burner for a little while - but hadn’t noticed the speeds before. Just want to know if this is normal, and if not what are the likely causes. The drive is currently only device on secondary @ CS, running UDMA mode 4.
Any help/info would be muchly appreciated.


#2

Try using the master setting instead of cable select. There’s no riplock on the 115 drive. You can do a transfer rate & burst rate test by using Cd/Dvd Speed then post the results.


#3

Ok, thanks for the quick reply

Ran the test as requested, results as follows. Any suggestions appreciated.




#4

CS is a bad idea…


#5

@ allblack67

Do you change your jumper setting from CS (Cable Select) to Master as suggested by Forum Member DVD_ADDICT ?

In many hardware configurations CS (Cable Select) is problematic. The preferred jumper configuration is Master.

Regards,
bjkg


#6

Thankyou for the replies. The above test was done with jumper set to master. Can I presume that the speed test results were pretty ordinary? Would like to hear any ideas on a fix with hardware or settings.

Allblack67


#7

@ allblack67,

Is posting #3 typical of ALL Commercially Manufactured ‘Pressed’ DVDs or just one particular Commercially Manufactured ‘Pressed’ DVD?

Have you tried another known proven Ultra DMA (80-Conductor) IDE/ATA Cable? Suggest reviewing the below Web Link and note all the comments concerning Connector Assignments and Color Coding and ensure that your Pioneer DVR-115D Burner is connected accordingly.

http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/if/ide/confCable80-c.html

Have you tried performing a transfer rate & burst rate test in the Safe Mode? In the Safe Mode was there a difference in the transfer rate & burst rate test?

Regards,
bjkg


#8

[QUOTE=bjkg;2100790]@ allblack67,

Is posting #3 typical of ALL Commercially Manufactured ‘Pressed’ DVDs or just one particular Commercially Manufactured ‘Pressed’ DVD?
bjkg[/QUOTE]

Yes, typical of all commercially pressed dvd’s

Have you tried another known proven Ultra DMA (80-Conductor) IDE/ATA Cable?
bjkg

Not as yet - will try a different cable when have some time off work - will this cause a difference between commercial and burnt dvd’s? as any dvd I have burnt rips quickly.

Have you tried performing a transfer rate & burst rate test in the Safe Mode? In the Safe Mode was there a difference in the transfer rate & burst rate test?
bjkg

By safe mode do you mean windows safe mode? If so, tried but it wouldn’t allow me to run it in safe mode under XP home. If you mean differently please explain.

Appreciate your time

Allblack


#9

@ allblack67,

A properly functioning DVR-115D should be reading Commercially Pressed DVDs at a faster rate than the 3.86 speed your DVR-115D is reading Commercially Pressed DVDs (average speed should be around 9.6 speed). Yours is not reading at the 9.6 average speed and attempting to understand why.

Possibly your Ultra DMA (80-Conductor) IDE/ATA Cable could be malfunctioning. That’s why suggesting trying a known proven Ultra DMA (80-Conductor) IDE/ATA Cable and also suggesting to ensure that your Ultra DMA (80-Conductor) IDE/ATA Cable is connected correctly as detailed in #7 posting Web Link.

Another possibility is that possibly some software is preventing your DVR-115D from reading Commercially Pressed DVDs at the correct speed.
When in the Widows Safe Mode (http://www.computerhope.com/issues/chsafe.htm) only minimal/essential programs, drivers, and files are loaded. If in the Windows Safe Mode performing a transfer rate & burst rate test your DVR-115D reads Commercially Pressed DVDs at the correct 9.6 average speed reveals that your “Slow Reading” problem is caused by some software. Then what would be required is to determine what particular software is causing the “Slow Reading” problem.

Regards,
bjkg


#10

[QUOTE=bjkg;2101780]@ allblack67,

Possibly your Ultra DMA (80-Conductor) IDE/ATA Cable could be malfunctioning. That’s why suggesting trying a known proven Ultra DMA (80-Conductor) IDE/ATA Cable and also suggesting to ensure that your Ultra DMA (80-Conductor) IDE/ATA Cable is connected correctly as detailed in #7 posting Web Link.

[/QUOTE]

Will grab hold of another cable tomorrow (heading off to work now, but day off tomorrow) and see if that sorts it out

When in the Widows Safe Mode

I can get into safe mode - but the nero speed transfer test will not run while under safe mode

I also tried a dvd I burnt of a home movie and that rips fine - just seems to be an issue with commercial dvds.

Regards

Allblack


#11

Ok an update

Changed over the IDE cable with a completely new one - no change in the ripping speed.

Also put an old NEC 3500 in, running as slave, and did transfer test and it ripped the exact same dvd at 11X average !!

Now I’m running out of ideas. Any further suggestions greatly appreciated.

Allblack


#12

Ok further update:

The old NEC drive that worked okay when I put it in, is also doing the same thing now. So I would assume there is something on my system that is limiting the rip speed as no further hardware or settings have been changed.

Would appreciate any ideas of what it could be or a way of determining what the conflict is.

Regards

Allblack


#13

Do you have daemon tools installed or nero incd? If you do uninstall it. Are you sure the new ide cable you bought is a 80 wire ide cable? Because if it’s not the 115 is not going to work correctly.


#14

[QUOTE=]Do you have daemon tools installed or nero incd? [/QUOTE]
Neither on my system. The system just recently went through a clean re-install, and this issue was occurring prior to this.

[QUOTE=] Are you sure the new ide cable you bought is a 80 wire ide cable? [/QUOTE]
Hope so, because that’s what I asked for

This has got me stumped.

Regards

Allblack


#15

http://www.centralcomputers.com/commerce/ccp28921--2320440-3-24-ide-uata-100-24--3-conn--hd-80-pin-c-20440-3-24-miscabideu1s.htm

That’s what a 80 wire ide cable looks like.

You can order 80 wire ide rounded cables from Svc.com for $2.99.
http://www.svc.com/ttc-a18-es.html


#16

@ allblack67,

Concerning your non-definitive response to the Ultra DMA (80-Conductor) IDE/ATA Cable question that Forum Member DVD_ADDICT asked have you reviewed the Web Link I provided in my #7 posting a week ago concerning Ultra DMA (80-Conductor) IDE/ATA Cable? The referenced Web Link provides a detailed descriptive picture of an Ultra DMA (80-Conductor) IDE/ATA Cable so there should not be ANY confusion of exactly what type of IDE Cable you actually have. To dispel any confusion definitively state exactly what IDE cable you currently have installed.

Also did you ensure that you correctly install the Ultra DMA (80-Conductor) IDE/ATA Cable as detailed in the “Connector Assignments and Color Coding” paragraph of Web Link provided in my #7 posting? To dispel any confusion definitively state exactly how you have Ultra DMA (80-Conductor) IDE/ATA Cable installed.

Example ->
The blue connector attaches to the motherboard.
The gray connector is in the middle of the cable and goes to the slave drive.
The black connector is at the opposite end from the blue connector and goes to the master drive.

Also have you confirmed that after IDE Cable replacement that your Pioneer DVR-115 is operating in the Ultra DMA Mode 4?

Regards,
bjkg


#17

The burst rate test he posted shows 41 MB/s. That won’t happen without an 80 conductor cable and the drive running in Ultra DMA Mode 4 aka DMA66.


#18

[QUOTE=bjkg;2108400]@ allblack67,

To dispel any confusion definitively state exactly what IDE cable you currently have installed.[/QUOTE]

It was replaced with an 80-conductor IDE cable as was suggested

Also did you ensure that you correctly install the Ultra DMA (80-Conductor) IDE/ATA Cable as detailed in the “Connector Assignments and Color Coding”

Example ->
The blue connector attaches to the motherboard.
The gray connector is in the middle of the cable and goes to the slave drive.
The black connector is at the opposite end from the blue connector and goes to the master drive.

Hooked up exactly as stated above with the corresponding correct jumper settings

Also have you confirmed that after IDE Cable replacement that your Pioneer DVR-115 is operating in the Ultra DMA Mode 4?

Yes as stated in my original post - this has not changed

As I stated in a previous post - did insert an old NEC burner which worked like a charm after I initially installed it, got speeds which were consistent with what I would expect (and did get in the past) but that drive has also now gone to the same slow rip speed of the pioneer. I would assume something on the system is limiting the speed but I can’t work out what.

Regards

Allblack


#19

Are you running all your tests with the same pressed DL DVD? I’ve run into a couple of DVDs that show smooth but very slow transfer rate curves. I never found a reason but it occurs very rarely.

Check the IDE controller mode for the drive channel in device manager. With XP, right click on “My Computer”, select “Properties”, then “Hardware”, then “Device Manager”. In the pop up window, expand “IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers” with the “+” sign, then right click on the IDE (“Parallel ATA”) controler and select “Properties”. The click on the tabs for the Primary and Secondary channels to see the channel mode and info on what’s connected to it.

As I mentioned previously, as long as you’re seeing ~41 MB/sec burst transfer rate reported, this is not your issue but it’s probably worth trying the burst rate on your NEC and/or checking with this to see if anything has changed. (Your NEC will probably have a slower burst rate as it only supports DMA33 from what I remember (~20-25 MB/s)

MCSE has an option to increase rip speeds on the 115D. You’ll need to modify both the firmware and the Flasher to enable the same firmware version to be flashed. I found the higher rip speed caused the drive to slow down on many pressed DVDs right before the layer break and not speed up again during the second layer but it’s worth a try as a test and easily reversible.