Old 09-01-2003   #1
CD Freaks Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 93
examples of condensation ineveryday life

Hey sorry for the dumb question but my friend is going nuts trying to find an example of condensation in everyday life not using water. Anyone got any ideas?

Last edited by el_walto; 09-01-2003 at 04:56.
el_walto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2003   #2
CDFreaks Resident
 
Flying Dutchman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: NYC / Binghamton
Posts: 1,369
Hmm, I guess one such case could be when water appears on your windshield after you park you car outside on a particularly humid night. Condensation also can occur on cold beverages in hot temperatures.

Someone double check this. I failed most of my science classes
__________________
I'm not spamming, I'm trying to help people

And the CDFreaks living room has reached a new low...
Flying Dutchman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2003   #3
CD Freaks Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 93
"not using water"
el_walto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2003   #4
Retired Moderator
 
dhc014's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,369
Water can't condense, but water vapor can!

Any liquid can condense as long as it is subjected to the right Pressure/Temperature... Think of a substance that exists as a liquid at room temperature, then think of a time that that would be a gas...
__________________
.:: Dave | http://dhc014.rpc1.org ::.
dhc014 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2003   #5
Dedicated DoMi groupie
 
iamrocket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: location, location
Posts: 453
Gases condense to become a star. (at least in theory). Electricity condenses into lightning (though I'm not really sure this is called condensation). Salt ocean water condenses into salt crystals in many places. I could shorten this paragraph alot (that would be condensing it).
iamrocket is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2003   #6
Resigned
 
Huzzy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 1,099
Like dhc014 said, ALMOST ALL vapours can condence (i say almost all because im sure there is 1 or 2 elements that dont conform, like the ones that exists for 10000th of a second and cant be weighed.


Thing is, water has the most resonable condense, and evaporate temps. 100 degrees C it boils and evaporates, a temp that is easy to reach in every day life around the home.

Perhaps chlorine would be the next closest, no idea.
Huzzy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2003   #7
MyCE Resident
 
DanDaMan1487's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 636
How about common house dust, which is very small, but when builds up, can be a little solid ball or something?
DanDaMan1487 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2003   #8
CD Freaks Member
 
Farad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: IL or SC, USA
Posts: 240
Sorry, but there are no vapors besides water and air in everyday life, and you'll never see air condense.
__________________
The most incomprehensible thing about the world is that it is at all comprehensible. -Einstein
LTR-52246S
Farad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2003   #9
MyCE Member
 
Prowler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: NE Pennsylvania
Posts: 160
Here's an example you can observe of a liquid other than water condensing. Gases when compressed and stored under pressure, butane or propane for example, change to a liquid state. When you release it from its container it changes back into a gaseous state. If you release it rapidly, especially when the ambient temperature is warm, you can see it actually condensing into a vapor. If you had enough of it you could literally cause a cloud, albeit an explosive one. Carbon dioxide gas is another example. Dry ice vapor is readily observable at room temperature. A good visual example is to add dry ice to water. The resulting dry ice fog behaves very differently than water vapor. It's heavier than air, so one can actually pour the fog from the container and see that it behaves like a liquid, although it is a gas in actuality.
Prowler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2003   #10
MyCE Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 60
Quote:
Originally posted by iamrocket
Gases condense to become a star. (at least in theory). Electricity condenses into lightning (though I'm not really sure this is called condensation). Salt ocean water condenses into salt crystals in many places. I could shorten this paragraph alot (that would be condensing it).
You misses one, Milk condenses into a can.
__________________
We don't inherit the Earth from our parents, we borrow it from our children.
biggles77 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2003   #11
CD Freaks Member
 
DryBaboon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: CHINA
Posts: 244
Your fridge or car air conditioning uses condensation:
http://www.howstuffworks.com/refrigerator4.htm
Although this is about condensation under pressure really, and I suspect you may be looking for temperature-related state changes.
I have to say, some of the answers here are either very worrying, or on a different plane of irony altogether.
__________________
________________________
Four cheers for me.
________________________
DryBaboon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2010   #12
New Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 1
Re: examples of condensation ineveryday life

Water is the most abundant thing in this world,, We practicaly cant think of anything about condensation without evaporation... If this was a project,, Go tell your teacher that.
Anielle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2010   #13
MyCE Resident
 
marloyd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Michigan ,usa
Posts: 9,360
Re: examples of condensation ineveryday life

anielle if this was a project this student failed because this was 7 years ago when this question was ask.
marloyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2010   #14
MyCE Resident
 
marloyd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Michigan ,usa
Posts: 9,360
You got me thinking about that question and there would not be condensation without water ,without water the only condensation would be the word (condensation) and we would not be.
Attached Images
 
marloyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2010   #15
MyCE Resident
 
cholla's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Amarillo ,Texas
Posts: 8,162
Re: examples of condensation ineveryday life

If the OP had limited his question to naturally occurring condensation I agree with marloyd.
Since the limitation was "everyday life" then that depends on who's' everyday life.
Almost every gas is condensed for use by humans for some use & someone probably uses that gas everyday .
I guess by technical definition electricity is not condensed because it is not gas condensed to liquid.
But then neither is condensed milk I guess it is misnamed.
__________________
cholla pronounced ˈchȯi-yə click on cholla to hear
cholla is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2010   #16
Senior Moderator
 
mciahel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Germany
Posts: 17,090
Re: examples of condensation ineveryday life

Apart from gases, all matter is condensed

Michael
mciahel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2010   #17
Administrator & Reviewer
 
Wombler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Northern Ireland
Posts: 12,776
Quote:
Originally Posted by marloyd View Post
You got me thinking about that question and there would not be condensation without water ,without water the only condensation would be the word (condensation) and we would not be.
Alcohol is distilled and condensed in a condenser as are petroleum based products or anything else that is refined by distillation.

I prefer drinking the alcohol based products though.

Mercury can be driven off from ore by heating and then condensed to form liquid mercury.

There are loads of examples that don't involve water.

Even more bizarrely some substances don't condense but undergo 'sublimation' and 'deposition' where they change directly from solid to gas then from gas to solid without passing through a liquid phase and this process is used to purify certain crystalline materials such as naphthalene which is used in mothballs.


Wombler
__________________
▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬
Forum Help: Forum Rules, Myce Help Centre
If you find these forums useful then: Register Here
DVDFab/ImgBurn: Choosing the correct Layer Break Position in ImgBurn
DVDFab: BDMV-REC Supported Burners
Reviews: Ideal DVD Copy, Magic DVD Copier, DVDFab DVD Copy v9

Wombler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2010   #18
Senior Moderator
 
mciahel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Germany
Posts: 17,090
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wombler View Post
Even more bizarrely some substances don't condense but undergo 'sublimation' and 'deposition' where they change directly from solid to gas then from gas to solid without passing through a liquid phase (...)
This is not bizarre, but totally normal
--> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phase_transition


Michael
mciahel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2010   #19
MyCE Resident
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,754
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prowler View Post
Here's an example you can observe of a liquid other than water condensing. Gases when compressed and stored under pressure, butane or propane for example, change to a liquid state. When you release it from its container it changes back into a gaseous state. If you release it rapidly, especially when the ambient temperature is warm, you can see it actually condensing into a vapor. If you had enough of it you could literally cause a cloud, albeit an explosive one. Carbon dioxide gas is another example. Dry ice vapor is readily observable at room temperature. A good visual example is to add dry ice to water. The resulting dry ice fog behaves very differently than water vapor. It's heavier than air, so one can actually pour the fog from the container and see that it behaves like a liquid, although it is a gas in actuality.
Dry Ice Vapor (Actually CO2 /Carbon Dioxide) doesn't form the visible cloud you see... it causes water in the air to condense, the CO2 remains invisible.

You can however sometimes see hydrocarbon vapors condense on a fuel filler nozzle while refueling your car in cold weather...

AD
AllanDeGroot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2010   #20
Administrator & Reviewer
 
Wombler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Northern Ireland
Posts: 12,776
Quote:
Originally Posted by mciahel View Post
This is not bizarre, but totally normal
--> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phase_transition


Michael
It's natural but it's a very unusual behaviour under normal atmospheric pressure.

In fact there aren't that many substances that do that under normal conditions.

Iodine, naphthalene and dry ice (solid carbon dioxide) are the only ones that I can think of off the top of my head.

Normal ice will do it too but at a very slow rate.

There may be more, but out of the billions of chemical substances and molecular structures that can exist that's really very very few indeed.


Wombler
__________________
▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬
Forum Help: Forum Rules, Myce Help Centre
If you find these forums useful then: Register Here
DVDFab/ImgBurn: Choosing the correct Layer Break Position in ImgBurn
DVDFab: BDMV-REC Supported Burners
Reviews: Ideal DVD Copy, Magic DVD Copier, DVDFab DVD Copy v9

Wombler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2010   #21
Senior Administrator & Reviewer
 
Seán's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Republic of Ireland (North West)
Posts: 11,181
Street lights, which use Low/High Pressure Sodium Lamps. If your street lighting is yellow or peach colour, you've got these.

A low pressure sodium lamp contains neon and argon gas and solid sodium metal. When switched on, the control gear ignites the arc in neon/argon gas mixture, giving that initial red glow. As the bulb warms up, the sodium metal vapourises and the arc turns yellow.

A similar process happens within High Pressure Sodium lamps. These HPS bulbs use a Xenon gas, like that in camera flashes, which gives it a white glow when first switched on. The higher pressure along with the addition of mercury in the arc tube increases the colour spectrum and thus the ability to see different colours instead of black & yellow.

As the sky brightens up at dawn, the street lights switch off and the bulbs cool down. In doing so, the sodium vapour cools, condenses and then solidifies as solid sodium metal.
Seán is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2010   #22
MyCE Resident
 
marloyd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Michigan ,usa
Posts: 9,360
Quote:
Originally Posted by el_walto View Post
Hey sorry for the dumb question but my friend is going nuts trying to find an example of condensation in everyday life not using water. Anyone got any ideas?

El walto has come up with a good debatable subject, I liked sean comment the best with the vapor light idea it's sealed unit.With a gas inside.And propane tanks are filled with air and gas but doesn't air have a percent of moisture in it..I'm not smart enough for this question and should keep nose out of it so I vote for sean's answer for best exsample.
marloyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2010   #23
MyCE Resident
 
Zathros's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Somewhere Out there
Posts: 1,555
Re: examples of condensation ineveryday life

Does Jelly count? Only picture I could find of this secretive process.
Attached Images
 
Zathros is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-12-2010   #24
MyCE Resident
 
marloyd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Michigan ,usa
Posts: 9,360
Condensation has a lot of down falls like this one ( to much salt)
Attached Images
 
marloyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-12-2010   #25
MyCE Resident
 
Zathros's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Somewhere Out there
Posts: 1,555
Re: examples of condensation ineveryday life

Quote:
Originally Posted by marloyd View Post
Condensation has a lot of down falls like this one ( to much salt)

Oh my, scientific proof of beer goggles!!
Zathros is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
TDK 003 aging examples (pi/pif)? maicod Blank Media 37 16-10-2008 15:16
Anyone have examples of what their printable discs look like? mayto Disc Printing and Labeling 3 12-12-2006 03:46
VB Examples Robert Horn Nero & InCD 4 25-07-2005 19:03
Where have you been in your life? Nosmartz Living Room 24 05-03-2005 13:18
DelphiNeroApi examples The Mask Nero & InCD 0 19-08-2004 23:13


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 15:00.
Top